2021-2022 Events


Please see below for our schedule of events for 2021-2022. These events include talks organized by SEISMIC and SEISMIC institutions, as well as events SEISMIC is co-sponsoring, and are open to anyone interested to attend. For more information, please contact our Speaker Events Bureau at  seismic.speakers.bureau@umich.edu  

Thursday

Sept. 16

12 pm EST

Sponsored by the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER) and  co-sponsored by the SEISMIC Collaboration, and the ASU RISE Center.

 

 

“Understanding oppression faced by Asian Americans”

Speaker: Sapna Cheryan, PhD, University of Washington  

Different racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. have been subordinated in different ways. This work integrates a dimension of cultural foreignness (Zou & Cheryan, 2017) along with the more commonly studied dimension of perceived status to understand forms of prejudice faced by Asian Americans. Using controlled laboratory and field experiments, self-generated discrimination experiences, and U.S. court cases, I will demonstrate Asian Americans’ perceived positioning as high status and culturally foreign in U.S society and consequences for the forms of discrimination they face. I will further provide experimental evidence that discrimination-based cultural foreignness may be seen by White Americans as less harmful than other forms of discrimination. This work moves beyond a “one size fits all” approach to discrimination to document the distinct forms of discrimination faced by Asian Americans in U.S. society and the accompanying challenges in addressing these forms of discrimination.

Talk Recording

 

Monday

Oct. 4

12 pm EST

Sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh

 

 

Speaker: Eduardo Gonzalez, UC Santa Barbara 

The University of Pittsburgh is hosting a SEISMIC talk with Eduardo Gonzalez. Please join using the link below. The link will be updated with a signup for the Zoom link a week prior to this event.

Link to Event Info

 

Thursday

Oct. 21

12 pm EST

Sponsored by the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER) and  co-sponsored by the SEISMIC Collaboration, and the ASU RISE Center.

 

 

“The meaning beyond the words: How language, race, & culture impact science teaching & learning”

Speaker: Bryan Brown, PhD, Stanford University 

This presentation explores how race, culture, and language intersect to create the condition of contemporary learning. For years, research on the language of classrooms explored how the way we say things impacts students’ sense of belonging. Despite this research, STEM education has failed to adequately explore how issues of race, language, and culture shape the outcomes of teaching and learning in science. Through a sequence of research, this presentation explores the theoretical and pragmatic aspects of this dilemma. From a theoretical perspective, the talk will explore the Language-Identity dilemma. As students learn, the way academic language is taught to them can present a cognitive and cultural conflict. From a cognitive perspective, if science is taught without respect to the implications of how language is learned, students can be misunderstood and misunderstand the teacher’s complex discourse. From a cultural conflict perspective, students may feel they are cultural outsiders when the language of the classroom positions them as outsiders. The presentation provides an overview of a series of qualitative and quantitative experiments that document the realities of this complex interaction.

Zoom link

Link to flyer

 

Thursday

Oct. 28

4 pm EST

Sponsored by the University of California Irvine

 

 

“Intervention on providing behavioral information to students”

Speaker: Qiujie Li (and Di) 

The UCI Education Research Initiative is launching its seminar series titled “Currently in Education Research.” The Currently seminar series is an opportunity to hear about the cutting edge work happening at UCI and beyond, and is a great way to receive feedback from an interdisciplinary audience of education researchers. We are excited to welcome an array of leading education researchers to UCI from across the country along with UCI faculty, postdocs, and students presenting projects of all stages, from a research idea that is still in its infancy to a project that is near completion.

Zoom link

 

Thursday

Nov. 4

4 pm EST

 

 

“Cracking the diversity code: Understanding computing pathways of those least represented in order to foster their representation”

Speaker: Monique Ross  

A significant gap exists in the understanding of factors that influence the participation of Black and Hispanic women in computer science. The objective is to listen to those often unheard in the conversation around broadening participation in computer science, in order to critically examine efforts and initiatives that impact engagement. This talk will describe the journey towards this objective and preliminary results. The outcomes of this work have the potential to reshape the community’s perceptions of what and who are computer scientists as well as crack the code to diversifying this lucrative  and impactful discipline.

Zoom link

 

Friday 

Nov. 5

1-2pm EST

Sponsored by AIM Research by the Center for Academic Innovation. 

 

 

“AIM Research: AI for Scalable Course Articulation Recommendation”

Speaker: Zachary A. Pardos, PhD  

Articulations serve as the gatekeepers to socio-economic mobility in systems of higher education. However, determining which course at one institution is academically equivalent to a course at another institution can be an intractable task when attempting to articulate and maintain articulations comprehensively and precisely between even a small set of institutions. In this talk, Dr. Pardos will present research on using AI to scale articulation recommendation by leveraging course catalog descriptions complimented by information contained within historic enrollment patterns to infer cross-institutional course equivalencies. Early pilots of this AI articulation involving faculty engagement will be discussed as well as its current limitations and productive challenges ahead.

Registration link

 

Monday

Nov. 15

12 pm EDT

Sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh

 

 

Speaker: Sarah Castle, Michigan State University 

The University of Pittsburgh is hosting a SEISMIC talk with Sarah Castle. Please join using the link below. The link will be updated with a signup for the Zoom link a week prior to this event.

Link to Event Info

 

Thursday

Nov. 18

4 pm EDT

Sponsored by the University of California Irvine

 

 

TBD 

Speaker: Soo Jeong  

The UCI Education Research Initiative is launching its seminar series titled “Currently in Education Research.” The Currently seminar series is an opportunity to hear about the cutting edge work happening at UCI and beyond, and is a great way to receive feedback from an interdisciplinary audience of education researchers. We are excited to welcome an array of leading education researchers to UCI from across the country along with UCI faculty, postdocs, and students presenting projects of all stages, from a research idea that is still in its infancy to a project that is near completion.

Zoom link

 

Thursday

Nov. 18

12 pm EDT

Sponsored by the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER) and  co-sponsored by the SEISMIC Collaboration, and the ASU RISE Center.

 

 

“Mapping the terrain of othering: Religious, gendered, and racial exclusion on historically white campuses” 

Speakers: Kameelah Mu’Min Rashad, PhD, Muslim Wellness Foundation (top) & Keon M. McGuire, PhD, Arizona State University (bottom)

On historically white campuses, too often conversations related to human diversity are most concerned with increasing cultural appreciation and awareness for non-dominant groups. Relatedly, discussions of inclusion for marginalized individuals focus on perceived economic, social, and cultural deficiencies of underrepresented students. However, these approaches often fail to interrogate the ways institutions are structured – both physically and intellectually – to exclude religious, gender, and racially minoritized students. Drawing on our work and research with Black students from various religious and spiritual backgrounds, we will make visible the various ways in which Whiteness, Christian hegemony, and heteropatriarchy work, and how we might respond in ways rooted in equity and justice.

Zoom link

Link to flyer

 

Monday

Nov. 29

12 pm EDT

Sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh

 

 

Speaker: Linda Adler-Kassner, UC Santa Barbara

The University of Pittsburgh is hosting a SEISMIC talk with Linda Adler-Kassner. Please join using the link below. The link will be updated with a signup for the Zoom link a week prior to this event.

Link to Event Info

 

Thursday

Dec. 2

4 pm EDT

Sponsored by the University of California Irvine

 

 

TBD 

Speaker: Laura Tucker   

The UCI Education Research Initiative is launching its seminar series titled “Currently in Education Research.” The Currently seminar series is an opportunity to hear about the cutting edge work happening at UCI and beyond, and is a great way to receive feedback from an interdisciplinary audience of education researchers. We are excited to welcome an array of leading education researchers to UCI from across the country along with UCI faculty, postdocs, and students presenting projects of all stages, from a research idea that is still in its infancy to a project that is near completion.

Zoom link

 

Monday  

Dec. 6

1-2pm EDT

Sponsored by AIM Research by the Center for Academic Innovation. 

 

 

“AIM Research: Course Choice and Inequality: Investigating First Math Choice”

Speaker: Monique Harrison 

Upon entry into college, and every term thereafter, students are confronted with the task of making choices – choosing extracurriculars, ranking dorms, and selecting courses (the topic of this talk). That discretion brings agency and a sense of freedom, but also the potential for stalled academic progress and the perpetuation of inequality. In this talk Monique Harrison will discuss the various course selection strategies first year students utilize to choose their first math class, and how this choice led to disparate experiences of their math courses and altered student trajectories. Harrisown will focus on first math courses in college because of the substantial importance of math in STEM pathways and the potential of positively impacting underrepresented students. 

Registration link

 

Monday

Dec. 6

12 pm EDT

Sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh

 

 

Speaker: Natalia Caporale, UC Davis

The University of Pittsburgh is hosting a SEISMIC talk with Natalia Caporale. Please join using the link below. The link will be updated with a signup for the Zoom link a week prior to this event.

Link to Event Info

 

Thursday

Jan. 20

12 pm EDT

Sponsored by the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER) and  co-sponsored by the SEISMIC Collaboration, and the ASU RISE Center.

 

 

 

“Effective, culturally responsive mentorship”

Speakers: Angela Byars-Winston, PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Effective mentorship matters in the talent development of future STEM professionals. Effective mentorship includes being culturally responsive to the differing social identities of trainees, especially related to racial and ethnic identity. This session will highlight supporting research on the facilitative role of culturally responsive practice and its relevance to mentorship of STEM trainees.

Zoom link 

Link to flyer 

 

Thursday

Feb. 10

12 pm EDT

Sponsored by the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER) and  co-sponsored by the SEISMIC Collaboration, and the ASU RISE Center.

 

 

“Reframing equity in STEM education with historically minoritized communities: Seeding rightful presence”

Speaker: Edna Tan, PhD, University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

This talk explores the inadequacy of framing equity in STEM education merely as inclusion into the established culture of canonical STEM reflexive solely of the epistemologies, ontologies, and axiologies of White middle-class heteropatriarchy. I introduce the framework of Rightful Presence as an approach to more critically, 1) survey the terrain of inequities in STEM education for minoritized populations as historical, systemic, and enduring that are manifested in particular, local ways, and the role of fostering more expansive epistemologies, ontologies, and axiologies in disrupting such inequities; 2) highlight the need to consider the temporal arc – past, present, future – of how minoritized youth engage with STEM across spaces as negotiated through particular social-spatial relationalities; and 3) consider what is entailed in terms of the design of justice-oriented STEM learning environments and pedagogical approach, to expand the epistemologies, ontologies, and axiologies of STEM to be reflexive of historically underrepresented Youth of Color and minoritized groups in STEM.

Zoom link 

Link to flyer

 

Thursday

March 17

12 pm EDT

Sponsored by the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER) and  co-sponsored by the SEISMIC Collaboration, and the ASU RISE Center.

 

 

“Creating a culture of access in academic biology: A focus on disability” 

Speaker: M. Remi Yergeau, PhD, University of Michigan

(Description coming soon). 

Zoom link